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Recommendations Summary

UWL: Medical Nutrition Therapy 2009

Click here to see the explanation of recommendation ratings (Strong, Fair, Weak, Consensus, Insufficient Evidence) and labels (Imperative or Conditional). To see more detail on the evidence from which the following recommendations were drawn, use the hyperlinks in the Supporting Evidence Section below.


  • Recommendation(s)

    UWL: Medical Nutrition Therapy

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is strongly recommended for older adults with unintended weight loss. Individualized nutrition care, directed by a registered dietitian (RD), as part of the healthcare team,  results in improved outcomes related to increased energy, protein and nutrient intakes, improved nutritional status, improved quality of life or weight gain.

    Rating: Strong
    Imperative

    • Risks/Harms of Implementing This Recommendation

      None.

    • Conditions of Application

      None.

    • Potential Costs Associated with Application

      Although medical nutrition therapy (MNT) costs and reimbursement vary, MNT is essential for improved outcomes.

    • Recommendation Narrative

      • Five studies were evaluated regarding Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) in older adults with unintended weight loss
      • One study reported that the prevalence of underweight or unintended weight loss may be as high as 35% (Mamhidir et al, 2006)
      • Four studies report that individualized nutrition care, directed by a registered dietitian on the healthcare team,  results in improved outcomes related to increased energy, protein and nutrient intakes, improved nutritional status, improved quality of life or weight gain (Faxen-Irving et al, 2002; Payette et al, 2002; Keller et al, 2003; Splett et al, 2003).

    • Recommendation Strength Rationale

      Conclusion statement in support of this recommendation received Grade I.

    • Minority Opinions

      Consensus reached.