This Academy member benefit temporarily has been made public to allow all practitioners access to content that may assist in patient care during the national pandemic response. Click here for information on joining the Academy. 

Energy Expenditure

EE: Table 3. Conclusion Statements, Accuracy of RMR Estimations (2006)

Table 3: Conclusion Statements—Accuracy of Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) Estimations  (1)

 

Equationa

Non-Obese (20-82 y)

(BMI 18.5-29.9 kg/m2)b

Obese (20-82 y)

(BMI > 30 kg/m2)

Older Adults (60-82 y)

Non-Obese and Obese

Mifflin-

St. Jeor

82% of estimates are

accurate; errors evenly distributed between under- and overestimation

Error Range:

Maximal underestimations by 18% to overestimations by 15% (Grade II)c

70 % of estimates are

accurate; errors tend to be

underestimates

Error Range:

Maximal underestimations by 20% to overestimations by 15% (Grade II)

Accuracy within 10% not available

Error Range:

Underestimations by 18% to overestimations by 5% in men; and underestimations by 31% to overestimations by 7% in women (Grade II)

Harris-Benedict (Actual Body Weight)

45-81% of estimates are accurate; errors tend to be overestimates

Error Range:

Maximal underestimation by 23% to overestimation by 42% (Grade I)

38-64% of estimates are accurate; errors tend to be overestimates

Error Range:

Maximal underestimations by 35% to overestimations by 57% (Grade I)

Accuracy within 10% not available

Error Range:

Underestimations by 19% to overestimations by 9% in men; and underestimations by 27% to overestimation by 12% in women (Grade I)

Harris-Benedict (Adjusted Body Weight)d

Not applicable

26% of estimates are accurate; errors tend to be underestimates

Error Range:

Maximal underestimation by 42% to overestimation by 25% (Grade I)

 

Individual prediction accuracy using adjusted body weight is not reported for older adults in any of the evaluated studies.

Owen

73% of estimates are accurate; errors tend to be underestimates

Error Range:

Maximal underestimation by 24% to overestimation by 28% (Grade II)

51% of estimates are accurate; errors tend to be underestimates

Error Range:

Maximal underestimation by 37% to overestimation by 15% (Grade II)

Accuracy within 10% not available

Error Range:

There is no individual error range for men. In Caucasian women, maximal underestimation by 27% to overestimation by 12%

(Grade III)

WHO/FAO/UNU

Individual prediction accuracy is not reported for non-obese adults in any of the evaluated studies.

Individual prediction accuracy is not reported for obese adults in any of the evaluated studies.

Accuracy within 10% not available

Error Range:

Maximal underestimation by 17% to overestimation by 7% in men. Maximal underestimation by 8% to overestimation by 12% in women (Grade III)

aThe formulas are listed with the most accurate formula at the top of the table.

bNon-Obese includes normal weight and overweight individuals based on BMI screening criteria.

cThe Grade refers to the strength of the evidence supporting the statement made about the accuracy of the formula—NOT TO THE ACCURACY ITSELF. For Example a Grade I for the Harris-Benedict using adjusted body weight for obese/overweight means that the evidence is GOOD that we know that only 26% of the estimates are accurate (within + or – 10% of the measured number). However the Grade II for Mifflin St-Jeor indicates that we have FAIR evidence to state that 70% of the estimates are accurate (within + or – 10%).  The Mifflin St Jeor appears to be a better formula than the Harris Benedict even though there aren’t as many confirmatory research studies published.

 dABW = [(actual body weight – ideal weight) X 0.25] + ideal weight